1. @sarahselecky’s #dailyprompts | Day one

    "Describe the sky."

    Through slatted blinds a pale blue sky, an imagined face streaked white with fading jet streams. Its chin tickled gently with the brightest beard of fall leaves, all resting on its chimney shoulders.

    (Like I said, day one.)

    j

     
  2. Touché.

    (Source: ofelias, via sodisarmingdarling)

     
  3. Return of the redhead

    Effortlessly remembering my tumblr password, after over a year, will be taken as a sign to tumble again? Sure. And 45ish sleeps until my leaving London can in turn be my tumbling catalyst. Voilà ! À toute ! x, j

    image

     
  4. (Source: staceymayfowles)

     
  5. (Source: lillyslunches)

     
  6. millionsmillions:


Paul Auster: The one thing I try to do in all my books is to leave enough room in the prose for the reader to inhabit it. Because I finally believe that it’s the reader who writes the book and not the writer. In my own case as a reader (and I’ve certainly read more books than I’ve written!), I find that I almost invariably appropriate scenes and situations from a book and graft them onto my own experiences—or vice versa. In reading a book like Pride and Prejudice, for example, I realized at a certain point that all the events were set in the house I grew up in as a child. No matter how specific a writer’s description of a place might be, I always seem to twist it into something I’m familiar with. I’ve asked a number of my friends if this happens to them when they read fiction as well. For some yes, for others no. I think this probably has a lot to do with one’s relation to language, how one responds to words printed on a page. Whether the words are just symbols, or whether they are passageways into our unconscious.
—BOMB 23, 1988

    millionsmillions:

    Paul Auster: The one thing I try to do in all my books is to leave enough room in the prose for the reader to inhabit it. Because I finally believe that it’s the reader who writes the book and not the writer. In my own case as a reader (and I’ve certainly read more books than I’ve written!), I find that I almost invariably appropriate scenes and situations from a book and graft them onto my own experiences—or vice versa. In reading a book like Pride and Prejudice, for example, I realized at a certain point that all the events were set in the house I grew up in as a child. No matter how specific a writer’s description of a place might be, I always seem to twist it into something I’m familiar with. I’ve asked a number of my friends if this happens to them when they read fiction as well. For some yes, for others no. I think this probably has a lot to do with one’s relation to language, how one responds to words printed on a page. Whether the words are just symbols, or whether they are passageways into our unconscious.

    BOMB 23, 1988

     
  7. I no longer want reminders of what was, what got broken, what got lost, what got wasted… The objects for which there is no satisfactory resolution.
    — Joan Didion (via pocketfullofspears)

    (via staceymayfowles)

     
  8. Robyn gives good gif.

    Robyn gives good gif.

    (Source: robynappreciationblog, via robyngifs)

     
  9. awesomepeoplereading:

Joseph Gordon-Levitt reads.

    awesomepeoplereading:

    Joseph Gordon-Levitt reads.

     
  10. "A chemical engineer, physician, and former Peace Corp volunteer, Mae Jemison was inspired by Star Trek’s Lieutenant Uhura to join NASA in 1987."

    "A chemical engineer, physician, and former Peace Corp volunteer, Mae Jemison was inspired by Star Trek’s Lieutenant Uhura to join NASA in 1987."

    (Source: coolchicksfromhistory)